Sunday, December 4, 2016

The Thin Gene

In the article "The Thin Gene" Abby Solomon is discussed and her genetic disorder. Solomon is 5"10 and only weighs 99 pounds. Solomon neonatal progeroid syndrome, a condition that results from damage to the FBN1 gene. This gene causes Solomon to get hungry every hour and she begins to starve if she does not eat. She dreams about food and enjoys food but she get full very quick. Even though she thinks about food all the time she still gets full very quick and still ends up consuming less calories then a normal women her age. This mutation also "mangles noses and eyes and destroys the layer of fat under the skin so that even teenagers look middle-aged. It also interferes with the body’s ability to make a hormone called asprosin, which regulates blood sugar". Dr. Chopra of Baylor college of medicine started doing research on Abby's disorder. Dr. Chopra said that this disorder is not like a normal eating disorder, this disorder causes Abby to snack a few times every hour in order to not pass out. Abby is a great opportunity for Dr. Chopra to do research on this gene and find out what causes it. As mentioned before the hormone asprosin, which is a blood circulating hormone; asprosin deficiency keeps Abby on the brink of starvation. Dr. Chopra got to thinking that if a deficiency in asprosin causes starvation in a sense then it could help people with obesity. They tested this on mice , and found that it can reverse insulin resistance and weight gain. I found all of this very interesting and I do think it could be a great break through to help people with obesity and diabetes. When asked if she wishes she was different Abby said she would not change anything about herself because this is a chance to get to find what is wrong with her and hopefully help others.

 

4 comments:

  1. I thought that it was refreshing to see someone like Abby view her differences as more of a blessing than a burden, by hoping that they one day help others. I think it is a brilliant idea to try and alter the gene to help individuals struggling with obesity and make the body feel fuller sooner, as well as influence starvation but keeping it at a controlled level. I wonder how this mutation alters one's life span, and if it affects their facial features/skin or if it would just affect weight?

    ReplyDelete
  2. I feel sorry for people with neonatal progeroid syndrome such as Abby. It must be hard to live with this disease, feeling a sense of starvation every hour. She maintains the right attitude in that some good can come out of the disease. Hopefully scientists can continue this research to invent some form of medicine to help treat obesity.

    ReplyDelete
  3. People such as Abby who see the situation they are in as an opportunity instead of a curse are truly inspirational. Many people in America suffer from obesity. The work being done thanks to Abby is a great opportunity to find a way to help these people, and possible others who also suffer Solomon neonatal progeroid syndrome.

    ReplyDelete
  4. My only hope is that any medicine that results from this work is highly regulated because sadly I could see it being a 'desirable' drug for those who suffer from certain eating disorders.

    ReplyDelete